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HIV infection, sexual and reproductive ill health and Gender Based Violence (GBV) are major public health concerns for Uganda, linked together in a complex cycle of causes and consequences.   To better address these complex issues and to meet the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV prevention needs of Ugandans it is important to prioritise innovative service delivery solutions. Integration of SRH/HIV services is one such approach.

Full review
 
The Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS) 2011 revealed that 56% of women aged between 15 and 49 years in Uganda have experienced physical violence at some point in their life, and that 28% of women in the same age group have experienced sexual violence, compared to 9% of
men. Perpetrators are often parents/guardians, current or former spouses, employers, domestic  workers and close relatives.
Full review

As of 2015, 1,500,000 people were living with HIV in Uganda. Among adults, HIV prevalence among adults aged 15-49 stands at 7.1%; while among women it stands at 8.3%. Evidence-based prevention programs, such as condom programming, voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), key population programs, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are cost-effective when they focus on those affected most. But we still have a long way to go.

 
Full review

Empowering women to choose the number, timing, and spacing of their pregnancies is not only a matter of health and human rights but also touches on many multisectoral determinants vital to sustainable development, including women’s education and status in society. Without universal access to family planning and reproductive health, the impact and effectiveness of other interventions will be less, will cost more, and will take longer to achieve. The government of Uganda must make modern family planning an even higher priority to expand women’s method choice and uptake. Emphasis should be on long acting reversible methods which are more effective and less expensive and will save more mothers and children in a more cost effective way. 

Full review
Fifty eight (58) Percent of women and girls in Uganda think that wife beating is justified (UDHS, 2011). Yet, Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) number 5 calls for the elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls, the end of all forms of gender-based discrimination, anthe elimination of harmful practices such as child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM).UNFPA’s work to mobilize key stakeholders in violence prevention contributes to the Fund’s larger task of leading the United Nations system in furthering gender equality and women’s empowerment
 
Full review

In spite of the significant progress made, Uganda still needs to do more in order to reduce the unmet need for Family Planning, which at 28% is still high and drive up the Modern Contraceptive Prevalence rate, which stands at 35%. Uganda stands the chance to make quick gains and meet its Costed Implementation Plan and FP2020 targets if additional steps are taken to address factors contributing to the unmet need for family planning.

Full review
More than three out of ten people in Uganda are young people age 10-24,  making Uganda one of the youngest countries in the world. Young people are shaping Social and economic development, challenging social norms and values, and building the foundation of the
country’s future. If the right investments are made for their empowerment to enable them explore possibilities and fulfi ll their potential, young people have the potential to drive the county’s socio-economic development.
 
 
Full review
UNFPA Uganda has integrated family planning into various other social and economic initiatives that ensure the overall well-being of individuals and communities becomes a reality. During 2016, we integrated family planning into agricultural extension activities, as
well as livelihoods and youth empowerment programmes. In addition, and as a result of UNFPA’s support, nine major cultural institutions and seven faith denominations have drafted and endorsed their own family planning messages as it relates to harmful cultural practices.
Full review
The Youth Enterprise Model (YEM) 2.0 targets young people in enterprise including the most vulnerable refugee youth. young people will be supported with skills building, business training, mentorship, health services and information, incubation, financing and resourcing to respond to development challenges. The programme will target young people at all levels including the out of school, secondary school graduates and those from tertiary institutions.   Successful young people from  will be supported to provide mentorship and coaching to young innovators in both the formal and informal sector. The programme will be modular and can be modified to suit different challenge areas that are affecting young people in different regions of the country.  
Full review
In the next 30 years, Uganda envisions a transformation from a peasant to a modern and prosperous society, with a per capita GDP of USD 9,500 by 2040 as detailed in ision 2040. Vision 2040 also acknowledges that the only single factor that will stop Uganda from attaining middle income status is the population growth rate, characterized by a young age structure and consequent high child dependency burden. Uganda has therefore pronounced itself onharnessing the demographic dividend, as a key strategy to achieving Vision 2040.
Full review

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